Advice for New Homebuyers

by Virginia Lindstrom 03/24/2021

Photo by LDprod via Shutterstock

Buying a house is more than the number of rooms and how it is staged. It’s a set of complex systems in a specific location. And while it’s not all about location, that’s a perfect place to start your list.

Where to Buy

Areas and neighborhoods trend for a variety of reasons. If you’re new to a city, consider renting for six to twelve months. That way, you can investigate all the neighborhoods to determine which one is right for you. For example, if you plan to have children, the hot market near the city center might not be best for you. Instead, you’ll want a home in a neighborhood with excellent schools, playgrounds, access to nearby shopping and family-friendly entertainment.

When to Buy

Once you know where you want to live, engage your real estate agent in helping determine when the best timing is. If you can afford to wait until fall or winter because prices often drop, then do so. Or, if you need to get in ahead of the “between school sessions” rush, get your offer in just after Super Bowl Sunday or before Spring Break.

What to Buy

This advice must adjust to your needs, of course, but buy what fits into your budget. Overbuying causes problems down the road when a repair completely busts your budget, and you end up with extensive problems. But don’t buy less than you’ll be happy with either. You need a home that meets your needs for years to come.

How to Buy

Lastly, don’t buy sight unseen or home uninspected. Purchasing a home without really looking at it or requiring a complete, professional, certified inspection can set you up for homeownership failure. Your agent can suggest an inspector to you, or you can hire one from a list of professionals. Pay attention to the notes and suggestions on the inspection and require corrections to any major systems. If you do purchase the home without adding that clause, set aside funds to repair or replace the offending appliance, pipes, wiring or structural issue before it becomes a major headache.

Don’t rely on a seller’s agent to handle the deal. Their responsibility is to the seller, and they are obligated to sell the home for the highest price with the fewest changes, upgrades or repairs required. A buyer’s agent, conversely, advocates for you, the buyer. That means they have your best interest in mind in negotiations, offers and the final outcome. If you’re hunting for a home, engage a buyer’s agent and let them do the heavy lifting for you.

About the Author
Author

Virginia Lindstrom

Hello and welcome to my website!

My Real Estate sales career began on June 18th 1985 at the age of 29- a wife & mother of 2 young children.

Within the 1st year I closed 5 sales and in January 1986, began my monthly marketing in the Lakewood Village neighborhood in Sunnyvale, where I made my very 1st sale and also took my 1st listing!

Over the last 3 decades, I've helped well over 450 families purchase and or sell their "American Dream".

I specialize in both Lakewood Village in Sunnyvale and the Cambrian area of San Jose, where I've lived for over 20 years. 

I now primarily help sellers with the sale of their property- whether it is their primary residence, or an investment cash out or 1031-Exchange, an Estate Trust sale or a Probate sale of a loved one who's passed away, I have vast knowledge and experience in all these areas of Real Estate.

I began my Real estate career with Century 21 Community Realty in Sunnyvale, until that office closed. Since then, I've been with Re/Max Real Estate Services in Cupertino and recently celebrated 26 years with Re/Max in October 2019.

I pride myself in being the best Real Estate professional I can be with integrity and honor at the forefront of my business career and my clients.

Thank you for visiting my website and I look forward to an opportunity to serve you and your family with all your Real Estate needs too!

Warmest Regards,

Virginia Lindstrom, Realtor